Comments for antique ring from russia

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
the markings
by: Anonymous

To the person who said it was not dated correctly needs to do more research. i said the ring was dated by an antiquities dealer from New York. As his business was to date things from different eras this was his life and was very reputable in New York. i also stated the Egyptologist stated they were not real hieroglyphics but jeweler's hieroglyphics or aka fun hieroglyphics..The drawing of the markings were done by my husband. He did his best. The Egyptologist called it an ibus. the unusual markings that everyone says are for 12 are incorrect. all of the markings together states it is 18 plus.I have seen those exact markings on a rug that was dated in 1800's so who is right? I tend to go with the expert.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Synthetic Alexandrite Update
by: Anonymous

Synthetic Alexandrites from Seiko in Japan have been known
since 1980 in the trade. They are grown by the floating zone method. Although some natural Alexandrites show a growth pattern similar to the synthetic Alexandrites grown by the "floating zone" technique natural alexandrite also reveal properties that confirm their natural growth origin.

The important point is: plane parallel growth structures associated with color zoning have not yet (June 2012) been observed in any synthetic alexandrite grown by Seiko.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Carat, Seagull & Date Letter
by: Egyptian Gold Marks

Hi concerning the markings on your ring. Egyptian expert and linguist thinks the marks, (or the drawings of the marks) are Egyptian gold marks. Although you did mention that a jeweler and archaeologist think the ring is Not Egyptian made. We are not exactly sure what information an egyptian archaeologist could provide concerning your modern ring?? No need to carbon date, it's clearly not an Ancient Egyptian antiquity and the marks are not hieroglyphs!

The bird is the Egyptian seagull which is the Egyptian standard mark for Gold in Egypt introduced in 1946, established by the administration of Assay and Weights. The numbers to the left of bird is 12 (carat) and the mark to the right of the bird is the arabic date letter year "Ain" - 1975-76.

Based on the expert's opinion, the 19th century date is not right.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
polariscope, plechorism & siberian alexandrite
by: Anonymous

yes thank you for the right name of the instrument . i was reviewing my notes on all of the equipment and You at least knew what i meant when i spelled it plechoriscope as a instrument.

It is the polariscope that checks the plechorism of the alexandrite. I love researching this stone. I have seen the brazilian up close in a goldsmith shop here in town. I still like the siberian alexandrite better personally. Less natural inclusions than the brazilian although some of them are quite clean to look at with the naked eye.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Gem Lab Tools
by: Anonymous

Hi Linda

you have brought up some very important points about identifying alexandrite. The temperature of the metal surround, for instance, could affect the color of alexandrite. Not many people think about that, even some of the gemologists;-)

It's what I call the gift of knowing - which I mention on the page about Natural Pearls. Some people are born with an eye for a pearl.

Even experience in the trade is not enough. I have been fortunate enough to have met a few opal miners from the outback australia in Coober Pedy, the old-timers, and there isn't any school or degree on the planet that can teach the knowledge these opal miners have gained about "color" in a university. The knowledge they have gained comes from experience.

Some people have what others cannot learn, the gift of knowing. They are born with an eye for a pearl, as some people are born with a gift for music or art or touching the heart of a man or woman. "A novice has much to learn but that he cannot learn".


Testing the stone with gem lab equipment, as you rightly mention is so crucial as you can't verify by just looking at this temperamental little gem.

I think you might have meant the gem lab tool - polariscope.
I have just added a link in the Jewelry Resources to a tutorial on the basics of how to use these gem lab tools.

Thank you for your contributions!


best regards
Yvonne Hammouda-Eyre


Rating
starstarstarstarstar
swissgemshop.com
by: linda

I have typed in the correct name for the shop that you can check out alexandrites on. I have been in contact with this company in the past.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
alexandrites
by: linda

I believe what a gemologist told me when he said the only way to tell a real stone is:

1.refractometer.2.plecoriscope3.dicroscope
4. density' and about four other tests to be done before you can say it is a real alexandrite or not. just looking at it with the jewelers loop is not enough.

in fact i was warned by one gemologist, to be careful. he would have loved to do the tests on the stone but the equipment was not available to him at that time. only a 60x microscope. He said there are quite a few jewelers who have missed a genuine stone and ruled it synthetic without the proper tests.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
synthetic corundum & mohs scale
by: Anonymous

Did i mention that the mohs scale for alexandrite is 8.5 and the corundum synthetic or real will always be a 9 on the mohs scale? everyone is under the impression that synthetic sapphires were quite large in the eighteen hundreds. when actually they were microscopic size until about 1902 when they were a little larger than a head of a pin and were able to be faceted. My ring is predating synthetic corundum. rubies and sapphires were the first synthetics to be created. then around 1960's the chatham lab in california created the alexandrite which became quite popular. I know for a fact that the alexandrite in certain lights can be blue-green or purplish red, depending on its origin. check out alexandrites at swissshop.com they describe the different areas and the color changes of alexandrites at least the last time I was there they did.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
daylight
by: linda

I have been researching this gemstone for about 17 years. I have had it to an antique dealer from new york who dated the ring 1850-1870. the gem he dated the same time period. In direct sunlight the ring will be purple in color. this was taken from an article written by a gemlologist. I believe it was called gem and gemstones. It said that shade, time of day, and time of year affects the color change.

also if the gold was heated at anytime with the stone remaining in the setting could also change the color aspect of the gem. although it remains an alexandrite for example it would still affect its over all color change abilities.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
True Alexandrite
by: Anonymous

True alexandrite changes from green to red, not from blue to purple as does the manmade synthetic alexandrite-like corundum which is often mistaken for the real thing.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
wallis simpson
by: linda

Thank you for the information on Walls Simpson. I have wanted to see some of her pieces but finding actual pictures have been hard for me to do, If you have sites available for more pictures of her jewelry I would love to see them. Her taste was similar to what my taste in jewelry is now.

She was the forerunner of costume jewelry being mixed with actual gems. What I mean is this, she was not afraid to mix and match her jewelry. Her necklace might be costume while her rings or bracelets were real diamonds etc.. This information I gathered on articles that I have found on her. I have mixed my pieces like that for years.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Sotheby's Jewels Department | Contact Details| Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor
by: Anonymous

Linda
the photo of this amazing stone taken in the daylight has been added to your original submission here. Glad to hear your son's now getting better!

On the topic of Sotheby's, I was just reading last week that Sotheby's are auctioning some of the jewelry and gifts once owned by Wallis Simpson, Duchess of Windsor, and her husband, the former King Edward VIII, this Fall. I think around November 30, 2010 preceded by a media showing of some of the historic valuables to be sold.

King Edward VIII, who was Queen Elizabeth's uncle, gave up his throne to marry Wallis Simpson, with whom he had been having an affair. The couple marked the milestones of their romance and 20 years of marriage with jeweled gifts.

Cartier jewels from Wallis Simpson and King Edward VIII is to be sold at the up-coming auction and among the pieces is the Cartier Diamond Bracelet that the Duchess wore on their wedding day.


Sotheby's International Jewellery Division is led by David Bennett in Europe and the Middle East, Lisa Hubbard in North and South America and Quek Chin Yeow in Asia. It includes published authors, lecturers and jewellery historians whose collective expertise and integrity place them among the most trusted and respected professionals in the field.


North and South America
Lisa Hubbard, Chairman, International Jewellery, Tel +1 212 606 7392
Gary Schuler, Senior Specialist, International, Tel: +1 212 606 7392

Europe and Middle East
David Bennett, Chairman, International Jewellery, Tel +41 22 908 4849
Alex Rhodes, Senior Specialist, International, Tel +44 20 7293 5311
Daniela Mascetti, Senior Specialist, International, Tel +44 20 7293 5308
Brett O'Connor, Senior Specialist, Europe, Tel: +41 22 908 4849


Reference:
http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/dept/Article.jsp?dept_id=41&article_id=0

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
stone in the natural light picture
by: linda

as you can see the natural pic is also on this site. that pic was taken in direct sunlight and before we knew that direct sunlight will make it look purple. I read several articles which say not to use direct sunlight to see it blue green. shade works better and certin times of the day.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
gia
by: Anonymous

I understand about the gia when i was in touch with sothebys of new york and christies they both told me this is who they deal with. my ring would have been authenticated a long time ago, but my son got sick so he was more important. Now things are starting to get back on the right track and I have been in touch with sothebys of toronto. soon i hope to go there but they still deal with gia of new york. who ever wants to go to favorite antique jewel on this site and look for the one that says possibly russian alexandrite and you will see the ring in full splendor. at least i think it shows a better profile of the ring.


Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Leading Gem Labs in USA
by: Anonymous

Linda, most gemological laboratories only identify gemstones, they do not appraise them.

Gem Laboratries in the USA

1. AGTA Gemological Testing Center New York, is the natural coloured gemstone industry's premier independent laboratory providing the industry and the public with a complete range of services, including gemstone identification, origin determination and pearl identification. The laboratory, located in New York City, is equipped with the latest, technologically advanced, investigative equipment.

2. American Gemological Laboratories New York, provides independent coloured gemstone identification reports on all coloured gemstones including emeralds, rubies, sapphires and alexandrite gemstones.

3.
GIA
is considered the world's most trusted name in diamond grading and gemstone identification. GIA's D-to-Z colour-grading scale and Flawless-to-I3 clarity-grading scale are recognized by gem and jewellery professionals everywhere. And, by extension, the GIA Diamond Grading Report, Diamond Dossier, and Gemological Identification Report are considered the world?s premier gemological credentials

Regards
Yvonne

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
direct sunlight & alexandrite gemstone
by: linda

articles i have read say alexandrites cannot be put in direct sunlight to see the blue green effect. in direct sunlight the color is purple as i believe it's the ultra violet and ultra red are in equal parts so it affects the stone. shade and certain times of day really shows the bluegreen, early in the morning and early evenings are when it really is visible. and i do believe i have a rare find but trying to prove it or find someone qualified enough where i live has been hard to do. on this site is an actual picture of the ring on my husband's hand so you can see how large it is.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
LIGHTING
by: Anonymous

does it remain green in sunlight, and fluorescent light, and change to reddish in candle flame and incandescent light?
if so,....you have a rare piece indeed.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
alexandrites
by: Anonymous

the siberian alexandrite is my favorite. i have been told it's too big to be real. but from all my research and knowing that the setting and the stone were made for each other and from what i know about synthetics it's too big to be synthetic from the time frame.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
alexandrite
by: linda

I must say out of all the gems I have seen in the world alexandrite is my favorite as well. Oh yeah the experts, lol. I have heard its to big to be real and Its synthetic corundum. but quess what it has been on a refractometer and the indices indicate it is not corundum or synthetic. One gemologist who wishes he had the equipment to check it but did'nt have it available, said be careful there are a lot of sharks out there.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Alexandrite
by: Anonymous

Hi Linda, oh my goodness, from the long list of gemstones, Alexandrite, is my favorite.

For what it's worth, if a Jewelry store has offered you some kind of verbal appraisal they're not doing their job properly and if an appraiserĀ“s first sentence is that "you paid to much for that gemstone", run the opposite direction; you are not getting an appraisal but you are a victim of a practice known as "low-balling".

Your best choice is a professional appraiser from a major appraisal organizations, like GIA with standards of education and codes of ethics. To protect the client they use methodologies that provide some assurance of accuracy.

Wow

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
Get the stone verified.
by: Anonymous

Hi Linda,

Alexandrite as I am sure you already know is a connoisseur gem and has a specialized market because it is so much more rare than many other precious gemstones. I believe, alexandrite with a good color change will command at least $10,000 even in a one-carat size.

Yes, I agree, have the stone verified and insured.

I have heard so many russian hallmark stories, not all hallmarks are what they appear to be, I strongly encourage you to get the stone authenticated by GIA, you don't want another opinion and pleeeeease let us know the results.

Linda here are some good links:


Here is a ink to russian hallmark question I think you will find interesting.

The owner of this Russian ring was fairly certain that the stone was synthetic corundum laced with vanadium.

best regards

Yvonne Hammouda-Eyre
Stay up to date with all the latest Antique jewelry news,
join the Antique Jewelry Investor community here....


Rating
starstarstarstarstar
authentication
by: Anonymous

Where I am located there are no experts who have the knowledge or the instruments to verify it. It must be taken to a lab where they have the knowledge and instruments to examine and determine what it is. The people here who had examined it had different opinions. However,a antiquities dealer from New York and a gemologist from Sothebys of Toronto were quite excited by it, but did not have the instruments needed to verify it, and impressed upon me to get it authenticated.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
verification
by: Anonymous

As I had said the scanner doesn't do justice to the actual color of the ring. It has to be checked by a G.I.A. institute for actual verification of the stone, but from all characteristics of the stone it appears to be a siberian alexandrite. But as i said it needs to be vertified.There are a number of tests that need to be done to determine it's authenticity.

Rating
starstarstarstarstar
What is the Stone?
by: Anonymous

Thanks for sharing....yes, this very large stone certainly doesn't look blue, green or any shade in between. In fact from this side of the pond, it looks like a red shade. I definitely wouldn't recommend anyone doing any gem identification on-line from scanned photos with this kind of result :-)

As you've already had this lovely ring examined by the experts, please would you tell us what the stone is?

best regards,
Yvonne




Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to General Estate Jewelry Question?.

Return to antique ring from russia.


XML RSSSubscribe To This Site
  • XML RSS
  • follow us in feedly
  • Add to My Yahoo!